Found 19 blog entries tagged as New Mexico.

In preparation for the Santa Fe Wine & Chile Fiesta next week, my post today is for my wine lovers as it is a long and detailed one.  Of course, I am deeply interested in all the details of grape varietals and growing, flavor pallets, etc. but today I am focusing on New Mexican wine growing.  If that isn’t your thing, you may want to skip this one.

Early American settlers found grapes growing wild along the East Coast and assumed that higher quality European varieties would also grow well where the wild grapes grew. But severe winters, disease, and insects caused the imported Vitis vinifera to fail.

 

Vinifera grapes require mild, dry climates like those in California, Arizona, southern New Mexico, and west Texas.  They may be injured by…

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New Mexico is the oldest wine country in America by roughly 200 years with a history of wine as rich as its colorful landscapes.  In 1598 Don Juan de Onate led Spanish colonists to the upper valleys of the Rio Grande with Franciscan monks following.  Wine was an important part of religious ceremonies but was difficult to attain in the region.  Initially, the monks were forced to use imported wine that contained 18% alcohol and 10% sugar and was transported in stoneware jugs which held approximately 2.6 to 3.6 gallons each and were sealed with a cork or wood plug.  The jugs were lined internally with a lead-based glaze – which could leak into the wine during prolonged exposure to heat or the acid in the wine.  The monks were desperate for a local…

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If you are visiting New Mexico there might be few words that you have never heard before. Don't worry we are here to help! We will be posting a new New Mexican word every week to familiarize you with our verbiage. Let us know if you have ever heard of these words before! 

Nicho (NEE-cho)

Made from traditionally from mixed elements, a nicho is a small cut out in an adobe wall that can be used to display objects such as a work of art or a pot. Most commonly found in Santa Fe homes, nichos bring a unique touch to any home. Here are a few examples of nichos in Santa Fe... 

       

  

  
Stunning, extraordinary, dramatic, sexy… These are adjectives that only begin to describe the magic of Casa Contenta. Hidden behind high walls, this secluded…

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Do you need a home for your horse? Look no further!

 

Board your horse at the Roy-El Farm centrally located in the beautiful Espanola Valley, an easy 30-minute drive from Santa Fe or Los Alamos, and only 45 minutes from Taos.

 

We have indoor and outdoor options, as well as indoor/outdoor combination paddocks.  Pastures are available for turn-out.  The facilities include both an indoor and an outdoor riding arena, a dressage court, 50’ round pen, tack room space, wash rack, heated washroom and heated lounge for relaxing.

 

Board is $425.00 per month and includes feeding twice per day as well as waste removal.  The Ranch Manager lives on site and we have ample trailer parking and turn around.

 

Basic health requirements must…

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Cold weather is upon us, and fireplaces are lighting up.  But do you have the right firewood to burn?

Any homeowner who regularly uses his or her fireplace in the winter months knows that dry, aged wood produces the best results for the ideal fire.  It burns better, produces more heat and produces less creosote build-up in your fireplace than green wood.  Green wood is hard to light and difficult to keep burning, it tends to smoulder and not burn consistently because it retains water.  You can usually tell the difference between older vs. green wood with a simple inspection.  Aged wood tends to have greyish bark and, on the inside, is dry and white, usually lighter than on the outside.  Young wood, instead, appears similar in colour throughout.  Aged…

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Turquoise has adorned the rulers of Ancient Egypt, the Aztecs (and possibly other Pre-Columbian Mesoamericans), Persia, Ancient Greece, Mesopotamia, the Indus Valley, and in ancient China.  It was cherished by the Pueblo, Navajo and Apache tribes. The Anasazi are believed to have prospered greatly from their production and trading of turquoise.  In Persia, turquoise was the de facto national stone for millennia. It was later brought to India following the establishment of the Mughal Empire (even being built into the Taj Mahal). Turquoise was (and still is) used extensively in Tibet and Mongolia.  The Egyptian use of turquoise stretches back as far as the First Dynasty and possibly earlier; though most well-known pieces were recovered from…

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One of my favourite places near Santa Fe is the historic Rancho Encantado, or Enchanted Ranch.  I grew up spending every New Year’s Eve at the Ranch with its gracious and inspiring owner Betty Egan.  It was also a preferred dinner post for my family and eventually became the site of my first employment and my sister’s wedding. I worked for the ranch as a wrangler, taking “dudes” out for horseback rides. I have many hilarious stories I could share, but one of the best was the day about 20 horses stampeded down the trail back to the stable.  As we reached the front gates, the horses sailed over them and charged up the main drive to the great surprise of the guests.  It was quite a harrowing sight!


Rancho Encantado‘s history is truly special, dating…

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You may have wondered what the colourful string of red peppers gracing the entrances of homes and offices around Santa Fe is all about.  Today, I am glad to share with you the story of the ristra.  Not only is it a beautiful and festive decoration, but it is also of practical use, as a way to dry chiles and preserve them for future consumption.  

 

A ristra is a string of drying chile pepper pods composed typically of large New Mexican chiles or Anaheim peppers, although any kind of chile may be used to construct it.  Chiles are in the genus Capsicum, which is in the nightshade family, and includes (interestingly) the tomato, potato, eggplant, tobacco and the petunia.  Colloquially, chiles are often referred to as "peppers," however, they are…

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Santa Fe is a community with a vibrant history including Spanish explorers, cowboys, pueblos, breath-taking vistas and transformational art.  The air carries a distinct scent of sage and pinon, and the sky is brilliantly illuminated by shades of red, orange and yellow twice per day.  It is a land of enchantment, filled with the promise of both tranquillity and adventure.

 

This remarkable city offers a wealth of culture, outdoor pursuits and style.  Whatever your desires, they can be satisfied in the City Different.  And with an average of 300 sunny days each year, you’ll be sure you can enjoy them.

 

If I had only 24 hours in Santa Fe, I would check into the La Fonda on the Plaza.  You can’t beat the location – smack dab in the middle of the…

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